Film

Glasgow Film Festival 2021 starts today 24 February – “Focus on Black women filmmakers” on MUBI

Opening today, Glasgow Film Festival invites audiences across the UK to preview some of 2021’s most exciting new films. Be the first to see two upcoming MUBI Releases, both screening at the festival. (Image credit: A Family Called Abrew )

Ben Sharrock’s critically adored comedy-drama LIMBO screens from 3 March, telling the story of four asylum seekers awaiting their verdicts on a remote Scottish island.

Kelly Reichardt’s FIRST COW, an award-winning masterpiece from one of the great modern American filmmakers, plays from 5 March.

A Focus on Black Women Filmmakers

  • 3 films

The under acknowledged work of Black British Female directors and producers continues to inform the limited ways in which the landscape of film is curated. This part of the strand is an offering of these works that sits within a Scottish context, whether through origin, setting and/or spatial memory.

Adapted from the Fringe First award-winning production, Expensive Shit is directed by Adura Onashile. Tolu, a Nigerian toilet attendant in a Glasgow nightclub, desperately manipulates the behaviour of unsuspecting women for the titillation of men watching behind the mirrors. Tonight she crosses a line and is forced to hand out a drugged bottle of water to the only punter she cares about.

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In the style of Sankofa Film Collective, director Maureen Blackwood sketches the Abrew family tree. A unique showbiz family whose story begins in Scotland at the end of the 19th century. Using archive material, footage of family members and intimate interviews, A Family Called Abrew shows that Black people have always been in Scotland, subject to erasure and invisibility.

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The first film directed by a Black British woman to receive a UK theatrical release, Ngozi Onwurah’s Welcome II the Terrordome opens with an Ibo family choosing to drown themselves rather than be enslaved. This imaginative Afrofuturist depicts a dark dystopia where Black people have been relegated to living in a slum, the Terrordome. Ahead of her time, the urgency of Onwurah’s work was not realised at the time, but 25 years later it encourages us to interrogate the contemporary experience of Black people in Britain and police brutality, from history until today.

This film has bonus content available.
After the film, scroll down to watch our Q&A with Writer and Director Ngozi Onwurah, and Producer Simon Onwurah.

These films are only available to view as part of this bundle and cannot be purchased individually. The Sold Out messages below do not apply when purchasing this bundle.

Content Warnings: Death, drug use, strong language / swearing, mild physical violence, racism / discrimination / slurs

Available from 13.30 on Friday 5 March until 13.30 on Monday 8 March

BOOK HERE AND FULL PROGRAMME

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