Beyond

National Gallery of Jamaica: Virtual Last Sundays to ft. Emily Ruth (Cellist) and Evad Campbell (Keyboardist)

On Sunday June 28, 2020, the National Gallery of Jamaica will once again present its Virtual Last Sundays programme on its YouTube channel and Instagram account. The second video in the online series will premiere at 1:30pm B. S. T. (7:30pm UK). (pictured left to right Emily Ruth and Evad Campbell)

Featuring musical performances by Emily Ruth and Evad Campbell, the programme will include brief interviews from the opening of their current Jamaica Jamaica! exhibition. Originally launched at the Philharmonie de Paris in 2017, the exhibition explores the origins of Jamaican music, its development and its rise to international acclaim.

Born in Manchester, Jamaica, Emily Ruth comes from an artistic family and had developed a love for the performing arts at an early age. Having devoted much of her life to music and dance, Emily went on to complete a Master’s degree in Applied Music Psychology at Roehampton University in London. Her main focus is teaching piano, cello and group music for young children at The Music House and creating music programmes for individuals with developmental challenges. She is currently a member of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Jamaica (POJ) as the principal cellist; is the choir director and a pianist at Hope United Church and plays for functions across the island.

Evad Campbell is a keyboardist, musical director, arranger and soundtrack producer born and raised in Kingston. He is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Music Degree at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA., and recently received the Berklee Achievement Scholarship Award which recognizes students who have demonstrated Academic, personal and professional success while at the college. During school breaks, he returns to Jamaica and works with groups such as the Ashe Company, UWI Panoridim Steel Orchestra, Bethel Steel Orchestra and his childhood music school, The Music House

Tune in here this Sunday 28th June on the National Gallery of Jamaica’s YouTube Channel 7:30pm if you are in the UK.

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